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7 Flush Valve Troubleshooting Tips

Posted on February 08 2018

5 Flush Valve Troubleshooting Tips


The
Sloan Royal Flush Valve is one of the most popular flush valves in use all over the world today. There may be times when your flushometer is not working properly. Here are seven flushometer troubleshooting tips that may help you the next time you encounter a problem:


1) Flush Length Too Short

If the length of the flush is too short, or if the valve turns off immediately when activated, there are several possible causes. First, the diaphragm assembly could be worn out or damaged. Secondly,  the handle assembly might be damaged. If either of these is the case, simply replace the diaphragm assembly or handle assembly. Having a low consumption diaphragm assembly installed in a water saver or conventional fixture could also be the cause of a short flush. In this case, check the label or markings on the fixture to learn what the required flush volume is. Then replace the diaphragm assembly or relief valve with one that is designed for the correct flush volume.

2) Flush Length Too Long

Sometimes, the duration of a flush can be too long. A common reason for this is that the by-pass orifice in the diaphragm may be clogged. To resolve this issue, remove the diaphragm assembly, disassemble the filter rings from the diaphragm, and rinse the diaphragm thoroughly. Be aware that the size of the orifice in the by-pass is of utmost importance in the proper metering of water into the upper chamber of the valve. Do not enlarge or damage this orifice. If cleansing does not correct the problem, replace the diaphragm assembly. Another reason for a long flush could be that the relief valve or the inside cover are damaged. Replace these parts if so. If a water saver/conventional diaphragm assembly is installed in a low consumption fixture, that could also cause a long flush. In this case, check the label or markings on the fixture to learn what the required flush volume is. Then replace the diaphragm assembly or relief valve with one that is designed for the correct flush volume.  One more possible cause is that the line pressure has dropped and is not sufficient to force the relief valve to seat. To resolve that problem, shut off all control stops until the pressure has been restored, then open them again.


3) Flush Valve Does Not Flush

Sometimes the valve might not flush at all. Check to see if the control stop or the main valve supply is closed. If they are, open them. General wear and tear can be expected over time, so if your valve isn’t flushing, it could be because the handle assembly is worn out. To fix it, simply replace the handle assembly, or use a handle repair kit. The same goes for the relief valve. It can get damaged over time, so it may need to be replaced.


4) Splashing Water

Water splashing out of a fixture can be unsanitary, as well as unsafe, creating a wet, slippery floor. If this is happening with your flushometers, there are two potential causes. One is that the control stop may be open wider than necessary. The other is that you may have the wrong diaphragm assembly installed in your valve. If you have a water saver/conventional diaphragm assembly installed in a low consumption fixture, check the label or markings on the valve to learn what the correct flush volume is, then install the parts that match that volume. Also, you may have a closet diaphragm assembly installed on a urinal. To resolve this issue, replace it with a urinal diaphragm assembly with a flush volume that matches your valve.


5) Insufficient Flush

There may be times when there is an insufficient volume of water to adequately siphon the fixture. The first thing to do is make sure that the control stop is open wide enough. Another cause could be that you have a urinal parts kit installed in a closet valve. In that case, simply install the proper parts kit. You may also have a low-consumption valve installed on a non-low consumption fixture. Again, simply install the proper parts to correct the problem. If you have a water saver kit installed in an old, non-water saving bowl, that could cause insufficient water volume as well. Finally, there may be inadequate volume or pressure at the water supply. If no gauges are available to properly measure the supply pressure or volume of water at the valve, then completely remove the entire diaphragm assembly and open the control stop to allow water to pass through the empty valve. If the supply is adequate to supply the fixture in this manner, then the restriction ring (A-164 on plastic guides) should be removed from the bottom of the guide to provide additional flow. If additional flow is still required, the refill head (A-170) may be replaced with a brass low flow refill head (A-85). Should neither of these steps prove satisfactory, then steps should be taken to increase the pressure and/or supply.

 

6) Chattering Noise

If you're hearing a chattering noise inside the valve during a flush, there are several possible parts that could be damaged: the inside cover, the relief valve, or the diaphragm assembly. Continue to check each one until the problem is found, and then replace the parts accordingly.

 

7) Leaking Water

If you see water leaking around the handle, the handle seal or handle assembly is worn or damaged. If the seal is worn, a handle repair kit will solve the problem. If the handle assembly itself is damaged in some way, you will need to replace the entire assembly.

 

For more tips on repairing Sloan flush valves, view our Flushometer Maintenance Schedule and see an inside view of a flushometer, learn how long parts are designed to last, and more. For those of you with Sloan G2 Flushometers, view our Troubleshooting a G2 Flushometer videos for G2 model specific troubleshooting. You can also give us a call at 800-442-6622 for more information. You’ll talk to a knowledgeable human, not a machine!